Trump campaign set on in-person debates despite COVID-19 diagnosis

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President Trump’s re-election team has no interest in holding the remaining debates against Democratic challenger Joe Biden remotely, senior advisor Jason Miller said Sunday — despite the commander-in-chief’s coronavirus diagnosis.

“We’re in a campaign,” Miller told “Meet the Press” host Chuck Todd on NBC when asked whether it would be prudent to move the contests online.

“We have a month to go,” he said. “We see Joe Biden and [Biden’s running mate] Kamala Harris out there campaigning. Certainly, they’re not asking for a remote debate.”

Miller also dismissed questions about whether Vice President Mike Pence — who has tested negative for the virus — should limit his exposure to people by staying off the campaign trail with Trump laid up at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

“I have no concerns at all,” he said. “The vice president takes very serious all of these measures. Anyone around the vice president are tested, people are kept very safe.

“And again, we can’t hide from this virus forever, Chuck. We have to take it head-on.”

Two days after a messy Tuesday night debate with Biden in Cleveland that saw the candidates skip handshakes and stay six feet apart as a medical precaution — Trump tested positive for the contagion.

A test on Biden came back negative.

Pence and Harris are still set to debate Wednesday night in Salt Lake City, though under additional precautions.

Trump and Biden still have two debates on the schedule — Oct. 15 in Miami and Oct. 22 in Nashville.

Kate Bedingfield, a deputy campaign manager for Biden, told George Stephanopoulos on ABC’s “This Week” that he too was open to the debates continuing as scheduled, so long as proper health precautions are taken and Trump’s health permits.

“We send President Trump our best. We hope that he is well and able to debate,” Bedingfield said Sunday. “If he is, Joe Biden will certainly be there.”