Trump vows campaign trail return amid COVID-19 battle

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WASHINGTON — President Trump vowed a triumphant return to the campaign trail on Monday just moments before he walked out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after contracting the coronavirus.

“Will be back on the Campaign Trail soon!!! The Fake News only shows the Fake Polls,” Trump told his 87 million followers, referring to a slump in his polling numbers since announcing he tested positive for COVID-19 on Friday.

The commander-in-chief’s physicians cleared him to be released from the Bethesda, Md., military hospital on Monday after he was helicoptered there on Friday evening with a spiking temperature and dropping oxygen levels, according to multiple reports.

Trump, 74, sought to allay fears about his condition during his four-day stay at Walter Reed, releasing daily videos with optimistic messages about how he was feeling great and was ready to get back to work.

On Sunday evening, he took a brief ride with the Secret Service to wave to supporters who gathered outside the hospital.

The president was on his way back to the White House residence on Monday evening where he will finish his treatment in isolation.

The White House he returns to is different than the one he left on Friday, with more than a dozen of Trump’s employees and associates now testing positive for the coronavirus.

The president’s prognosis upended the presidential election with just a month until Election Day and effectively grounded the Trump 2020 operation.

President Trump returning to the White House in Marine One today.AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Trump’s campaign manager Bill Stepien has also since been infected with COVID-19, along with White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany.

White House physician Dr. Sean Conley told reporters on Monday that he was cautiously optimistic about the president’s condition but said he was not out of the woods yet.

“We all remain cautiously optimistic and on guard because we’re in a bit of unchartered territory when it comes to a patient that received the therapies he has so early in the course, so we’re looking to this weekend,” Conley said.

“If we can get through to Monday with him remaining the same or improving, better yet, then we will all take that final deep sigh of relief,” he went on.